What I Learned with my First Month of Unlimited Audiobooks

Over the course of the past month I’ve taken my first steps in to the world of audiobooks! I won the Scribd giveway that was all over my instagram and now have unlimited audiobooks for a year!

I’ve listened to (at least parts of) four audiobooks and I wanted to share my experiences with you and some of the things I’ve learned.

So here we go…

  1. Janesville by Amy Goldstein

This was my first ever audiobook – I needed to read it for book club in a week and couldn’t get a library copy so just played it on audio. I learned…

  • Following six+ story lines on audio is hard. There are characters popping up from here and there and you don’t have the benefit of seeing large paragraph breaks to know the story is changing or being able to flip backwards to find the name in a previous chapter (or better yet use x-ray on your kindle paperwhite)
  • I really enjoyed listening to the intro and more factual parts on audio. Those parts can drag on when reading through it, but on audio it felt like a news report or a podcast, and that kept me engaged. I also enjoyed being able to increase the speed to 1.2 or 1.5 if the content was really slow.

2. The Confusion of Languages by Siobhan Fallon

The last time I drove to LA and back I listened to all the episodes of Ponzi Supernova. This time I decided I would listen to a book. I started driving early in the morning so ended up listening to news for most of the time until I had had my coffee and was able to focus on a book without falling asleep. I listened to the first 100 pages on audio and then finished the book in the written format. I learned…

  • I really like starting books I own/may want to finish in hardcopy on audio when I’m driving or otherwise unable to read. My current TBR feels out of control right now and having a side audiobook when I have so many other books to read isn’t relaxing or satisfying. This was a great use of my time in the car and got me past a lot of the plot build up, so I could boost through the book when I got home.
  • It took me a minute to adjust to reading the names and associating them with the character I had been hearing about. For some reason reading Margaret and hearing Margaret felt different for me and I had to pay attention for the first bit to associate written names with voices. I also totally heard the narrators voices throughout the rest of the book as I was reading the hardcopy.

3. A Piece of the World by Christina Baker Kline

I borrowed A Piece of the World from the library. Since it was an Express Book, I only had it for two weeks with no renewals available, so I used Scribd to speed up my reading. This was a great book and one that I LOVED listening to on audio. I learned…

  • With a slow book, I focused on the story so much better on audio while doing household chores than when trying to just sit down and read. As I wrote in my review, this book was a little slower than others that I’ve read and I struggled to keep my concentration when reading it.  I really loved the story and still felt engaged with it, even though I was listening while doing other things.
  • I don’t have to do something with my hands when I’m listening. While I mentioned above that I was able to keep my attention while doing household chores, I also found that I could lay on the couch and look out the window and have the same attention. I always thought that I should be coloring in a coloring book or doing a chore while listening to audiobooks, but sometimes you can just listen.

4. An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

I recently quit my job and as a result my last week of work was really slow. While all I wanted to be doing was reading Still Life at home, I was stuck at my desk. So I decided to start my next book on audio while I sat there. I learned…

  • Good narration can totally bring a story to life. This book is powerful and the feelings are so intense. Reading sometimes allows you to be an observer, but listening to it brought me in. I have to admit that I didn’t read the pages in print so it is possible that the writing would have sucked me in as well, but in this case I was so satisfied with the power of the narration
  • Audiobooks are great for alternating narrators. As I noticed in The Confusion of Languages, each character had their own voice and it felt totally different from reading their names. Particularly in this case when the two voices (for the first 100 pages) were a male and a female, it was so easy to keep track of and worked really well.

So what does this all mean for picking out a great audiobook?

So far I have loved fast paced fiction that I already own with alternating narrators (2-3 … not 6). I also love having the option of unlimited audiobooks for that time you want to start a book on a long car ride, or when a book just isn’t keeping your attention in its written format!

When my Book of the Month subscription runs out later this year, I think I’ll trade it for an unlimited audiobook membership. It has been a great way to enhance my reading without adding books to my unread shelf!

4 thoughts on “What I Learned with my First Month of Unlimited Audiobooks

  1. Congrats on winning unlimited audiobooks! That’s awesome. It’s great that you’re figuring out what works for you. I’ve discovered that I do best with nonfiction on audio, and also children’s books (go figure!) But my podcast addiction is strong, so I don’t do audio books that often.

    Like

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